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Aside

Windows 8 – A simple start screen button

Great post by Greg Ramsey if you are working with Windows 8.

Read the full post here.

I’ve been spending some time testing Windows 8 and Server 2012 lately, mostly on virtual machines. If you’ve worked with either OS in a VM (or even Remote Desktop), you may have noticed the challenge in hitting the start screen button. . .er orb.   It is very easy on a real monitor, because you simply move the mouse to the bottom-left corner of the screen. But on a VM, you can quickly move from the bottom-left corner of the VM to the applications on ‘the real’ system.

Aside

ConfigMgr Startup Script Update V1.54

Jason Sandys has released an updated version of his client startup script.

Download the script here.

Lots of new features since 1.03 including:

  • Bug fixes
  • More error checking
  • Better and more error messages
  • Automatic ConfigMgr client agent hotfix installation
  • Startup delay
  • Time stamps
  • WinPE check
  • Local administrator check
  • Calling of an external script to check WMI in-depth (or fix it)
Aside

MMS 2012: CD-B351 Configuration Manager 2007 R3: Simplify Your Deployments Demo Content

Kent Agerlund and I spoke last week at MMS 2012. We had great feedback from the people that attended and we were the #1 session for Monday. Thank you to everyone who attended, we’re happy to share our knowledge!

Kent posted all the content we demo’d in our session. In addition I’ve also linked everything below. Please let us know if we missed anything that we demo’d.

Scripts and utilities that we demonstrated

Script to remove expired updates from you distribution points and update packages
Example used in the session:
cscript.exe DeleteExpiredUpdates.vbs /SMSProvider:CM01 /PkgID:"A010000E" /AssignmentID:"1;2;3;4;5;6;7;

Coretech Shutdown Utility to control computer restarts after patching
Example used in the session:
/t:300 /m:60 /d: “You computer has not been restarted for a week\” /f /c /ebM:168

Script (ConfigMgr package) to uninstall software updates
Example used in the session:
cscript.exe UninstallUpdates.vbs 976902

Coretech Application Creator:
Example used in the session: Created a pacakge, collection, 2 programs, 2 collections and 2 Active Directory security groups

Change source location:
Example used in the session: Modified source location for packages prior to migrating packages to ConfigMgr 2012

Reports:

Reports to list last computer restart for Windows 7 clients:

SELECT os.Caption0 AS ‘Operating System’, cs.Name0 AS Name, DATEDIFF(hour, os.LastBootUpTime0, ws.LastHWScan) AS ‘Uptime (in Hours)’, CONVERT(varchar(20),
os.LastBootUpTime0, 100) AS ‘Last Reboot Date/Time’, CONVERT(varchar(20), ws.LastHWScan, 100) AS ‘Last Hardware Inventory’
FROM v_GS_WORKSTATION_STATUS AS ws LEFT OUTER JOIN
v_GS_OPERATING_SYSTEM AS os ON ws.ResourceID = os.ResourceID INNER JOIN
v_GS_COMPUTER_SYSTEM AS cs ON cs.ResourceID = os.ResourceID
WHERE (os.Caption0 LIKE ‘%Windows 7%’) AND (ws.LastHWScan <> 0) AND (cs.Name0 IS NOT NULL)
ORDER BY Name

Aside

How To: Inject Drivers from USB During a ConfigMgr Operating System Task Sequence

Fellow MVP Greg Ramsey has put up a really great post on injecting drivers from USB during a Task Sequence.

Read the full post here.

ConfigMgr OSD does a great job of injecting drivers ‘on the fly’ into your OS Deployment process. For example, you can create task sequence steps with conditional statements to apply drivers for a specific model. That’s great for your standard build, but how do you handle those one-offs, those non-standard builds? Here’s a process that you can you for those non-standard builds, or for that hardware that you’re testing, but haven’t quite committed to being a standard yet.  All we need is a vbScript, raw drivers, and an additional step in your task sequence (haven’t tested with MDT, but should work there as well). The following process ONLY works on Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. If there is enough demand, I’ll create a similar script for previous Operating System versions.

…..

Aside

Configuration Manager–Recovering Stock Reports and Bulk Deleting Reports

Recently was working at client, we caused ourselves a slight reporting issue.  We had exported all the reports from a previous site, including custom reports.  When we imported those into the new site, we overwrote the stock reports.  What happens when you do this is that it breaks all the built in reporting links.

You lose the links like this example below.

image

In order to recreate the stock reports and ensure the appropriate links are there, we simply need to duplicate the process that creates the original reports.  This can be achieved by running a mofcomp against the smsrprt.mof file that is located in \installpath\bin\i386.

image

One you have done this, you will be able to look at the stock reports and all the links that were previously missing will now be there.  This creates the original stock 332 reports, this doesn’t include the AI, FSP or FEP reports that might be added when additional features are added or installed.

In addition during this process and testing, there isn’t a nice way to delete multiple reports. No way to do this via the ConfigMgr console is provided.  So I wrote a simple script to allow you to delete multiple reports.

The following VBscript will delete multiple reports and you can specify the ID range you want to delete.  if you uncomment out the echo commands, you can be prompted as each report is deleted, but that isn’t very efficient if you are deleting a lot of reports.

   1: Dim objswbemservices

   2: Sub ConnectToSCCM()

   3:   set objSwbemLocator = CreateObject("WbemScripting.SWbemLocator")

   4:   set objSWbemServices= objSWbemLocator.ConnectServer(".", "root\sms")

   5:   Set ProviderLoc = objSWbemServices.InstancesOf("SMS_ProviderLocation")

   6:  

   7:   For Each Location In ProviderLoc

   8:         If Location.ProviderForLocalSite = True Then

   9:             Set objSWbemServices = objSWbemLocator.ConnectServer(Location.Machine, "root\sms\site_" + Location.SiteCode)

  10:         End If

  11:   Next

  12: End Sub

  13:  

  14: ConnectToSCCM()

  15:  

  16: For each objreport in objswbemservices.execquery("select * from sms_report")

  17:     If objreport.reportid >= 1 And objreport.reportid <= 378 Then

  18:         then objreport.delete_

  19:             'Wscript.Echo "Deleted report: " & objreport.ReportID

  20:             'Wscript.Echo "Report name: "    & objreport.Name

  21:     End If

  22:  

  23: Next

Aside

Automatically populate the SCCM Client Patch property during OSD

One of my previous posts has been incredibly popular.  I worked with Michael Murgolo on testing a great ConfigMgr hotfix that would automatically apply hotfixes during a ConfigMgr OSD Task Sequence. 

Matt Benninge has created a new version of the hotfix script with some very nice feature adds.  Matt added the following features:

  • Hotfixes are installed in order based one numbers. So my script installs KB2000 after KB98 where Michael’s would do the opposite.
  • I always assume that the OS-disk will end up as C:, Michael’s script would not work if you had a Bitlocker partition during WinPE that was C: and OS as D: which then would become C: only after system had booted into “full OS”.
  • You have the ability to exclude hotfixes with my script
  • Limitation: The Hotfixes must all be located in a folder starting with “KB”, if this is not true that hotfix will be ignored.

My original post on how to install still holds true, and Matt has a post on how to use the script and some of his new features posted here.

Aside

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit–Hydrating ConfigMgr Secondary Sites with MDT Lite-Touch

The following solution(s) are provided as-is without any warranty, confers no rights and is not supported by the Author(s). Use at your own risk.

Installing and configuring Configuration Manager Secondary Sites is often a manual and time consuming task. If you have 50 or more sites that can be a significant amount of time spent installing and configuring Secondary Sites. The Hydration approach attempts to resolve that issue by providing an automated way to setup and configure Secondary Sites.

The following Hydration solution can be run on an existing Server 2003 or Server 2008 R2 Operating System and will configure the necessary pre-requisites and install the Configuration Manager Secondary Site.

Assumptions

This document assumes the following:

· You have Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 Update 1 installed

· SQL is configured to allow Named Pipes

· You have already created a SQL$ share

· You have the knowledge required to work within the MDT Deployment Workbench

Supported Operating Systems

The Hydration process has been tested on Server 2003 R2 SP1/SP2 and Server 2008 R2 SP1.

Hydration Files

The files are contained in a “HydrationShare.zip” archive. Once these files are extracted, you will need to modify a few of the script files and add the required source files. This section details those required changes.

The files are provided as a self-contained DeploymentShare. You can simply extract this archive out and open the folder with the Deployment Workbench.

Sources files are required for the following items under the Applications directory in the HydrationShare.

Table 1: Required Source Files

Folder

Description

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3\Source

R3 installation files

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3\Hotfix

R3 Pre-req hotfix 977384

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary\PreReqs

ConfigMgr downloaded preq-reqs’s

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary\Source

ConfigMgr installation files

\ConfigMgr 2007 Toolkit V2\Source

ConfigMgr Toolkit MSI

\ConfigMgr Server 2003 IIS\i386

I386 directory from Server 2003 media

Installation

Extract out the HydrationShare

Extract the HydrationShare.zip archive to the location you want the HydrationShare to reside.

Share the HydrationShare

Once the files are extracted out, you need to share out the HydrationShare. A Hidden share is recommended.

clip_image001

Open the HydrationShare

1) Open the Deployment Workbench

2) Right-click on Deployment Shares and select Open Deployment Shareclip_image002

3) Select the path for the extracted HydrationShare filesclip_image004

4) Select Next

5) Select Next

6) Select Finish

Creating the MDT Database

This Hydration solution relies on a “SCRIPTSITECODE” variable. This solution was developed around this information being populated in the MDT database. It is possible to configure and set this variable through other methods, but this guide will not address those.

1) Open the MDT workbench and expand the HydrationShare.

2) Select Advanced Configuration-Database

3) Right-Click on Database and select New Database

4) Input the name of the SQL server and make sure the Network Library is selected to Named Pipes, then select Next

clip_image006

5) Input MDT2010 for the Database Name and select Next

clip_image008

6) Input SQL$ for the SQL Share, then select Nextclip_image010

7) Select Next

8) Select Finish

Extending the MDT database

Provided with the Hydration files are 2 SQL files for extending the MDT database with the SCRIPTSITECODE value and refreshing the views.

Open the “create scriptsitecode.sql” in SQL Management Studio.

Ensure that you are pointing to the MDT database.

clip_image012

Once you are pointed to MDT Database. You can Execute the query.

You should see “Command(s) completed successfully”

clip_image013

Next open the “refresh MDT views.sql” and make sure you are again pointed to correct database.

clip_image015

You should see “Command(s) completed successfully”

clip_image013[1]

If you open up the MDT workbench, go into Advance Configuration – Database- Computers, you will now see a new property called ScriptSiteCode listed on the Settings tab.

clip_image017

Bulk Importing Records Into The MDT Database

A PowerShell script and CSV file are provided for the bulk import of computers into the MDT database. These computers are the servers we want to configure as Secondary Sites.

CSV

The CSV file contains the Description, MacAddress, and ScriptSiteCode values we want to import into the Database.

clip_image018

We use the MacAddress to identify the server and configure the appropriate SiteCode for the ConfigMgr installation. The SiteCode is stored in the ScriptSiteCode variable. The description is just a friendly name so we can identify the server in the database.

PowerShell Script

The provided PowerShell script will do a bulk import of the CSV file into the MDT database. The PowerShell script imports a MDT Module, connects to the MDT database and imports the information from the CSV file.

Edit the PowerShell script to make sure the paths are correct to the source files.

clip_image020

Edit the PowerShell script to make sure the correct SQLServer and Database are specified.

clip_image022

After running the import, you will see the records in the Database based on the information in the CSV.

clip_image024

clip_image026

Configuring the HydrationShare

Once you have opened the HydrationShare with the Deployment Workbench and created the MDT database, there are a few changes that need to be made for the HydrationShare to successfully work.

Under the main HydrationShare properties, make sure the share name is correct and the local path is correct for the location you have put the HydrationShare.

clip_image028

Under the Rules tab, make sure your [CSettings] section has the correct SQLServer and Database name.

clip_image030

Ensure your bootstrap.ini has the correct DeployRoot value.

clip_image032

Under the Rules tab, configure the AdminPassword value to match the local administrator password of the servers you will run the Task Sequence on. This allows the Task Sequence to automatically log in and continue after the required reboots. This is required for the auto-logon to work correctly.

clip_image034

After making the required changes, right click on the HydrationShare and select Update Deployment Share.

clip_image035

Select Next.

clip_image037

Select Next.

clip_image039

Select Finish.

clip_image041

Required Script Modifications

(OPTIONAL) InstallConfigMgr2007SP2.wsf

There is a section of code in this script that allows you to specify existing source files to use, if we can find those, we will use those to install ConfigMgr, otherwise we’ll use the files from the script source files directory.

The following code would need to be changed in the script to match the location you might have local source files. It is located at line 93 in the script.

sFile = "F:\folderpath\smssetup\bin\i386\setup.exe"

ConfigureSvr2003.wsf

There is also logic in the 2003 IIS script that checks for a local copy of the i386 directory. We look for the i386 directory at the root of the C: drive. If we don’t find it then we copy it down from the source files. In addition we set a few registry keys to let Windows know where the source files are located. If you wanted to change this location, you would need to modify the following lines of code.

Line 57 – Check for local i386

sFile = "C:\i386\setup.ex_"

Lines 70-72 – Update registry to point to C:\i386

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\SourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\ServicePackSourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

CreateConfigMgrSenders.wsf

The sender creation script is coded to the primary site. This will need to be modified to point to your primary site.

Lines 51-52

primSiteCode = "001"

primSite = "2008-configmgr"

Using The HydrationShare Task Sequence

Pre-requisites

Server 2003:

· None

Server 2008 R2:

· UAC is disabled

· Server Manager is not configured to start (R3 will fail if it detects any open MMC)

clip_image042

· Script is launched with administrative rights (careful of “Run” credentials)

Starting the Task Sequence

The Task Sequence can be started by launching the Lite-Touch process from the Run box.

Use the following command:

“Cscript.exe \\servername\hydrationshare$\scripts\litetouch.wsf

clip_image043

Once started, you will see the Task Sequence selection screen, select Next to continue.

clip_image045

On the credentials screen, provided an account that has appropriate credentials to connect to the HydrationShare. (Read Acces)

clip_image047

After clicking Next, the process will start. (Example screen from 2008 R2)

clip_image049

Download the HydrationShare here.

Aside

Configuration Manager–Hydrating Secondary Sites with ConfigMgr

The following solution(s) are provided as-is without any warranty, confers no rights and is not supported by the Author(s). Use at your own risk.

Installing and configuring Configuration Manager Secondary Sites is often a manual and time consuming task. If you have 50 or more sites that can be a significant amount of time spent installing and configuring Secondary Sites. The Hydration approach attempts to resolve that issue by providing an automated way to setup and configure Secondary Sites.

The following Hydration solution can be presented in 2 forms. It can be presented as a Post Operating System Task Sequence that will configure either Server 2003 or Server 2008 R2 systems for being a Secondary Site. The 2nd method is to integrate the steps into a Task Sequence that also deploys a Server 2003 or Server 2008 R2 image along with configuring the server to be a ConfigMgr Secondary Site.

Assumptions

This document assumes the following:

· You have a working and properly configured Configuration Manager 2007 SP2/R3 Primary Site

· You have Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 Update 1 installed

· You have integrated MDT with ConfigMgr

· You have an existing MDT toolkit package

· SQL is configured to allow Named Pipes

· You have already created at least one DeploymentShare in MDT

· You have already created a SQL$ share

· You have the knowledge of how to create the required ConfigMgr packages

Supported Operating Systems

The Hydration process has been tested on Server 2003 R2 SP1/SP2 and Server 2008 R2 SP1.

Hydration Files

The files are contained in a “ConfigMgr_Install.zip” archive. Once these files are extracted, you will need to modify a few of the script files and add the required source files. This section details those required changes.

The following tables details the included file/folder structure.

Table 1: Folder Structure

Folder

Description

\SQL Files

SQL files to extend MDT database and refresh views

\Import_Computer

PowerShell and CSV for bulk import of ConfigMgr Secondary Site servers

\Templates

Task Sequence template and CustomSettings.ini template

\Configure WebDAV

Script to configure WebDAV for Server 2008 R2

\ConfigMgr Server 2003 IIS

Script to configure IIS for Server 2003

\ConfigMgr Create Senders

Script to create Primary site to Child site sender

\ConfigMgr 2007 Toolkit V2

ConfigMgr Toolkit (trace32)

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary

Script and source files for installing ConfigMgr secondary site

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3

Script and source files for installing ConfigMgr R3 and necessary pre-requisite hotfix

Source Files

Sources files are required for the following items.

Table 2: Required Source Files

Folder

Description

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3\Source

R3 installation files

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3\Hotfix

R3 Pre-req hotfix 977384

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary\PreReqs

ConfigMgr downloaded preq-reqs’s

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary\Source

ConfigMgr installation files

\ConfigMgr 2007 Toolkit V2\Source

ConfigMgr Toolkit MSI

\ConfigMgr Server 2003 IIS\i386

I386 directory from 2003 media

Installation

Creating the MDT Database

This Hydration solution relies on a “SCRIPTSITECODE” variable. This solution was developed around this information being populated in the MDT database. It is possible to configure and set this variable through other methods, but this guide will not address those.

1) Open the MDT workbench and expand your DeploymentShare

2) Select Advanced Configuration-Database

3) Right-Click on Database and select New Database

4) Input the name of the SQL server and make sure the Network Library is selected to Named Pipes, then select Next

clip_image002

5) Input MDT2010 for the Database Name and select Next

clip_image004

6) Input SQL$ for the SQL Share, then select Nextclip_image006

7) Select Next

8) Select Finish

Extending the MDT database

Provided with the Hydration files are 2 SQL files for extending the MDT database with the SCRIPTSITECODE value and refreshing the views.

Open the “create scriptsitecode.sql” in SQL Management Studio.

Ensure that you are pointing to the MDT database.

clip_image008

Once you are pointed to MDT Database. You can Execute the query.

You should see “Command(s) completed successfully”

clip_image009

Next open the “refresh MDT views.sql” and make sure you are again pointed to correct database.

clip_image011

You should see “Command(s) completed successfully”

clip_image009[1]

If you open up the MDT workbench, go into Advance Configuration – Database- Computers, you will now see a new property called ScriptSiteCode listed on the Settings tab.

clip_image013

Bulk Importing Records Into The MDT Database

A PowerShell script and CSV file are provided for the bulk import of computers into the MDT database. These computers are the servers we want to configure as Secondary Sites.

CSV

The CSV file contains the Description, MacAddress, and ScriptSiteCode values we want to import into the Database.

clip_image014

We use the MacAddress to identify the server and configure the appropriate SiteCode for the ConfigMgr installation. The SiteCode is stored in the ScriptSiteCode variable. The description is just a friendly name so we can identify the server in the database.

PowerShell Script

The provided PowerShell script will do a bulk import of the CSV file into the MDT database. The PowerShell script imports a MDT Module, connects to the MDT database and imports the information from the CSV file.

Edit the PowerShell script to make sure the paths are correct to the source files.

clip_image016

Edit the PowerShell script to make sure the correct SQLServer and Database are specified.

clip_image018

After running the import, you will see the records in the Database based on the information in the CSV.

clip_image020

clip_image022

Configuration Manager Packages

The following folders from the Hydration files will need be to created as Packages in ConfigMgr.

clip_image023

These packages will be used by the Task Sequence template. No Programs are required for the packages, simply create a Package that references the source files so we can make them available to the Task Sequence.

clip_image024

NOTE: The ConfigMgr Toolkit can simply be imported as a MSI.

Task Sequence Template

A Task Sequence XML is provided in the \Templates folder in the Hydration files.

clip_image025

This template contains all the necessary steps to configure either a 2003 or 2008 R2 server for being a Secondary Site. In addition to the packages containing the Hydration files, we need to use MDT Toolkit Package and a Settings Package.

The required steps in the template need to be configured to point to the ConfigMgr packages you have created.

clip_image024[1]

CustomSettings.ini

A customsetings.ini for use with Task Sequence template has been provided in the \Templates folder.

clip_image026

The SQLServer and Database values will need to be changed to match your environment.

clip_image027

Ensure that the Gather step in the template is pointing to your Settings package.

clip_image028

Required Script Modifications

InstallConfigMgr2007SP2.wsf

There is a section of code in this script that allows you to specify existing source files to use, if we can find those, we will use those to install ConfigMgr, otherwise we’ll use the files from the script source files directory.

The following code would need to be changed in the script to match the location you might have local source files. It is located at line 93 in the script.

sFile = "F:\folderpath\smssetup\bin\i386\setup.exe"

ConfigureSvr2003.wsf

There is also logic in the 2003 IIS script that checks for a local copy of the i386 directory. We look for the i386 directory at the root of the C: drive. If we don’t find it then we copy it down from the source files. In addition we set a few registry keys to let Windows know where the source files are located. If you wanted to change this location, you would need to modify the following lines of code.

Line 57 – Check for local i386

sFile = "C:\i386\setup.ex_"

Lines 70-72 – Update registry to point to C:\i386

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\SourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\ServicePackSourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

CreateConfigMgrSenders.wsf

The sender creation script is coded to the primary site. This will need to be modified to point to your primary site.

Lines 51-52

primSiteCode = "001"

primSite = "2008-configmgr"

Using with an OSD Task Sequence

The provided TS template in \templates can also be used with an OSD TS to create a Secondary Site from bare-metal. The template can simply be copied into an existing OSD TS.

clip_image029

 

Download the script files here.

Aside

Querying MDT/ConfigMgr Logs in MDT Scripts

Michael Murgolo has a nice post over on The Deployment Guys Blog.

Read the full post here.

The Lite Touch Deployment Process end in a Summary Wizard pane that displays any warning or errors that were logged in the MDT master log (BDD.log).

clip_image001

This is a great feature but customers have pointed out that this summary is not preserved after the Summary Wizard is closed.  If you accidentally Finish before reading everything, you now have to open the log and start trawling through it.

So what I was initially going to do to preserve this information was to change Summary_scripts.vbs (the part of the Summary Wizard code that does the work) to write the same information to a text file.  However, as I pondered this I realized that there was no general purpose function for querying logs in SMS format.  So instead of just changing Summary_scripts.vbs I decided to create such query functionality and then use that.

…..

Aside

ConfigMgr–Automating The PreLoadPkgOnSite Tool Script

Credit to Greg Ramsey for writing the script.

 

In addition to this post, be sure to read John Marcum’s blog post:

 

Packages Will Not Uncompress After Using Preloadpkgonsite.exe

 

After upgrading a few servers at a client site, we had to reinstall the Secondary Sites. Surprisingly we didn’t want to resend 400+ packages across the WAN to the remote sites.  The PCK files were still sitting on the server from the previous installation.

 

After reading John’s post and chatting with Greg Ramsey, I decided to use his script.  I had a few issues initially and Greg being the awesome guy he is helped me sort them out.

 

One VERY important thing to note is that you have to send at LEAST one package to the remote site before you can preload content, not sure why that is the case, but John saw the same thing.  After sending one package, the preload tool works great.

 

Once you have the script, you’ll need to make sure the paths are correct for your environment and it’s pointing to the correct server.

 

Make sure the connection string is pointing to the right server and site code.

 

image

 

Make sure the SMSPKG folder paths are correct.

 

image

 

Make sure the output path is correct as well.

 

image

 

Next we want to run the createpreloadbat.ps1 script in powershell.

 

image

 

You will end up with a preloadpck.bat in the output path and you will see the script spit out all the PCK’s it found.

 

image

 

image

 

Next if you run the preloadpck.bat, you will see it update the database. You will see it make the connection to the database and it will let you know if there are any issues.  (in this example screenshot the packages are already distributed)

 

Again, remember you have to send at least one package ahead of time (pick a small one), otherwise you’ll see a rights error.

 

image

 

Finally you can add your DP to the package using the copy packages wizard or CloneDp or whatever you want to use. When the DP receives the request for the package it will use the local PCK instead of requesting a new one.

 

Enjoy!

 

Download here: PreLoadPkgOnSite