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Aside

ConfigMgr 2012 SP1 USMT to UNC Templates

I’ve had several people contact me asking if I had new templates for ConfigMgr 2012 for my popular USMT to UNC posts I’ve done in the past.  I’ve cleaned up the process quite a bit over the years and here is what I’ve been using with clients lately. In this blog post I will explain how I configure my Task Sequences to capture to a network location and I will provide links for the templates you can download.

There are many times where capturing/restoring USMT to a network share fits into the workflow better than using the built in State Migration Point (SMP).  The SMP is encrypted, which is a good thing, but can cause issues for swapping data between devices.  You are also required to create computer associations before you do a capture, which some times people forget to do.  So an easy solution is to simply capture USMT to a network share instead.  This process can be configured to dynamically move to different servers for different locations without much difficulty but I won’t be discussing that in this post.

Set Variables

The first thing I do in the Task Sequence is create a Set Variables group where we can set a few properties to be used in the Task Sequence.

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The first variable we set is a ServerA property.  This is the name if the server you want to capture the data up to. This step is conditioned to only run if the ServerA value is not already defined. If you are using MDT integration, you can define the ServerA value dynamically using the Database. This is commonly used to account for different geographical locations.

The second step we use to define the MigData variable. We take the ServerA value and create the path with the built-in OSDComputerName variable available to the Task Sequence.

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The third step in the Set Variables section we use to set the OSDStateStorePath variable which is what USMT will actually use. We use this value so we can use the built-in USMT steps in the Task Sequence.

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Capture User State

The USMT Capture section is made up of 3 steps.

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The first step creates the directory in the targeted OSDStateStorePath location. This ensures the folder for the computer name exists. If the folder doesn’t exist, we can’t dump the user state data to it. This step is conditioned to continue on error, if the folder already exists, then the step will error out.

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The second step is optional, but is an example of how you would pass additional parameters to the built-in Capture User State step. In the templates, I’m doing a /uel:90, which excludes all accounts older than 90 days. We do this using the variable OSDMigrateAdditionalCaptureOptions.

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The third and final step in the USMT capture group is the default Capture User State step. You can customize which XML’s you want to use and the step will automatically process the values we have set previously.

Restore User State

One of the big advantages of using a process like this to capture user state is that we are dumping the data to a network share.  If you are using the templates I’ve provided or created a similar process using the steps in this blog post, then User State will automatically be  restored whenever a matching folder name is found. No association is required, if we can find data in the OSDStateStorePath then we will restore it.

The USMT Restore process also consists of 3 steps.

The first step simply sets our OSDStateStorePath variable again.

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The second step configured additional restore options. In the templates/example, I’ve used a /ue:%computername%\* which excludes all local accounts from being restored.

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The third and final step again simply uses the built in Restore User Step. This will use the OSDStateStorePath variable we’ve set and the OSDMigrateAdditionalRestoreOptions values together with however you have chosen to configure the Restore User State Step.

Templates

The first template I’ve created is for a stock ConfigMgr Task Sequence without MDT Integration. This has all the steps I’ve discussed configured for you, with explanations of what each step is doing.

These templates were created on a ConfigMgr 2012 SP1 lab environment, I don’t believe you can import these into a RTM site without issues.

If you are not going to use the templates I’ve provided, then you will need to configure your Task Sequence using the logic I discussed in this blog post and you will need to disable/remove all existing Request/Release/Move State Store steps in the Task Sequence. Those are used to work with the SMP and we won’t be needing those.

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The second template is configured for a MDT integrated Task Sequence.

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Download the Templates here:

Windows-8-x64-NCS-Template-ConfigMgr

Windows-8-x64-NCS-Template-MDT

Aside

Microsoft Deployment Toolkit–Hydrating ConfigMgr Secondary Sites with MDT Lite-Touch

The following solution(s) are provided as-is without any warranty, confers no rights and is not supported by the Author(s). Use at your own risk.

Installing and configuring Configuration Manager Secondary Sites is often a manual and time consuming task. If you have 50 or more sites that can be a significant amount of time spent installing and configuring Secondary Sites. The Hydration approach attempts to resolve that issue by providing an automated way to setup and configure Secondary Sites.

The following Hydration solution can be run on an existing Server 2003 or Server 2008 R2 Operating System and will configure the necessary pre-requisites and install the Configuration Manager Secondary Site.

Assumptions

This document assumes the following:

· You have Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 Update 1 installed

· SQL is configured to allow Named Pipes

· You have already created a SQL$ share

· You have the knowledge required to work within the MDT Deployment Workbench

Supported Operating Systems

The Hydration process has been tested on Server 2003 R2 SP1/SP2 and Server 2008 R2 SP1.

Hydration Files

The files are contained in a “HydrationShare.zip” archive. Once these files are extracted, you will need to modify a few of the script files and add the required source files. This section details those required changes.

The files are provided as a self-contained DeploymentShare. You can simply extract this archive out and open the folder with the Deployment Workbench.

Sources files are required for the following items under the Applications directory in the HydrationShare.

Table 1: Required Source Files

Folder

Description

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3\Source

R3 installation files

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3\Hotfix

R3 Pre-req hotfix 977384

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary\PreReqs

ConfigMgr downloaded preq-reqs’s

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary\Source

ConfigMgr installation files

\ConfigMgr 2007 Toolkit V2\Source

ConfigMgr Toolkit MSI

\ConfigMgr Server 2003 IIS\i386

I386 directory from Server 2003 media

Installation

Extract out the HydrationShare

Extract the HydrationShare.zip archive to the location you want the HydrationShare to reside.

Share the HydrationShare

Once the files are extracted out, you need to share out the HydrationShare. A Hidden share is recommended.

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Open the HydrationShare

1) Open the Deployment Workbench

2) Right-click on Deployment Shares and select Open Deployment Shareclip_image002

3) Select the path for the extracted HydrationShare filesclip_image004

4) Select Next

5) Select Next

6) Select Finish

Creating the MDT Database

This Hydration solution relies on a “SCRIPTSITECODE” variable. This solution was developed around this information being populated in the MDT database. It is possible to configure and set this variable through other methods, but this guide will not address those.

1) Open the MDT workbench and expand the HydrationShare.

2) Select Advanced Configuration-Database

3) Right-Click on Database and select New Database

4) Input the name of the SQL server and make sure the Network Library is selected to Named Pipes, then select Next

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5) Input MDT2010 for the Database Name and select Next

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6) Input SQL$ for the SQL Share, then select Nextclip_image010

7) Select Next

8) Select Finish

Extending the MDT database

Provided with the Hydration files are 2 SQL files for extending the MDT database with the SCRIPTSITECODE value and refreshing the views.

Open the “create scriptsitecode.sql” in SQL Management Studio.

Ensure that you are pointing to the MDT database.

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Once you are pointed to MDT Database. You can Execute the query.

You should see “Command(s) completed successfully”

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Next open the “refresh MDT views.sql” and make sure you are again pointed to correct database.

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You should see “Command(s) completed successfully”

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If you open up the MDT workbench, go into Advance Configuration – Database- Computers, you will now see a new property called ScriptSiteCode listed on the Settings tab.

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Bulk Importing Records Into The MDT Database

A PowerShell script and CSV file are provided for the bulk import of computers into the MDT database. These computers are the servers we want to configure as Secondary Sites.

CSV

The CSV file contains the Description, MacAddress, and ScriptSiteCode values we want to import into the Database.

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We use the MacAddress to identify the server and configure the appropriate SiteCode for the ConfigMgr installation. The SiteCode is stored in the ScriptSiteCode variable. The description is just a friendly name so we can identify the server in the database.

PowerShell Script

The provided PowerShell script will do a bulk import of the CSV file into the MDT database. The PowerShell script imports a MDT Module, connects to the MDT database and imports the information from the CSV file.

Edit the PowerShell script to make sure the paths are correct to the source files.

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Edit the PowerShell script to make sure the correct SQLServer and Database are specified.

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After running the import, you will see the records in the Database based on the information in the CSV.

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Configuring the HydrationShare

Once you have opened the HydrationShare with the Deployment Workbench and created the MDT database, there are a few changes that need to be made for the HydrationShare to successfully work.

Under the main HydrationShare properties, make sure the share name is correct and the local path is correct for the location you have put the HydrationShare.

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Under the Rules tab, make sure your [CSettings] section has the correct SQLServer and Database name.

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Ensure your bootstrap.ini has the correct DeployRoot value.

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Under the Rules tab, configure the AdminPassword value to match the local administrator password of the servers you will run the Task Sequence on. This allows the Task Sequence to automatically log in and continue after the required reboots. This is required for the auto-logon to work correctly.

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After making the required changes, right click on the HydrationShare and select Update Deployment Share.

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Select Next.

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Select Next.

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Select Finish.

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Required Script Modifications

(OPTIONAL) InstallConfigMgr2007SP2.wsf

There is a section of code in this script that allows you to specify existing source files to use, if we can find those, we will use those to install ConfigMgr, otherwise we’ll use the files from the script source files directory.

The following code would need to be changed in the script to match the location you might have local source files. It is located at line 93 in the script.

sFile = "F:\folderpath\smssetup\bin\i386\setup.exe"

ConfigureSvr2003.wsf

There is also logic in the 2003 IIS script that checks for a local copy of the i386 directory. We look for the i386 directory at the root of the C: drive. If we don’t find it then we copy it down from the source files. In addition we set a few registry keys to let Windows know where the source files are located. If you wanted to change this location, you would need to modify the following lines of code.

Line 57 – Check for local i386

sFile = "C:\i386\setup.ex_"

Lines 70-72 – Update registry to point to C:\i386

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\SourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\ServicePackSourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

CreateConfigMgrSenders.wsf

The sender creation script is coded to the primary site. This will need to be modified to point to your primary site.

Lines 51-52

primSiteCode = "001"

primSite = "2008-configmgr"

Using The HydrationShare Task Sequence

Pre-requisites

Server 2003:

· None

Server 2008 R2:

· UAC is disabled

· Server Manager is not configured to start (R3 will fail if it detects any open MMC)

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· Script is launched with administrative rights (careful of “Run” credentials)

Starting the Task Sequence

The Task Sequence can be started by launching the Lite-Touch process from the Run box.

Use the following command:

“Cscript.exe \\servername\hydrationshare$\scripts\litetouch.wsf

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Once started, you will see the Task Sequence selection screen, select Next to continue.

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On the credentials screen, provided an account that has appropriate credentials to connect to the HydrationShare. (Read Acces)

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After clicking Next, the process will start. (Example screen from 2008 R2)

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Download the HydrationShare here.

Aside

Configuration Manager–Hydrating Secondary Sites with ConfigMgr

The following solution(s) are provided as-is without any warranty, confers no rights and is not supported by the Author(s). Use at your own risk.

Installing and configuring Configuration Manager Secondary Sites is often a manual and time consuming task. If you have 50 or more sites that can be a significant amount of time spent installing and configuring Secondary Sites. The Hydration approach attempts to resolve that issue by providing an automated way to setup and configure Secondary Sites.

The following Hydration solution can be presented in 2 forms. It can be presented as a Post Operating System Task Sequence that will configure either Server 2003 or Server 2008 R2 systems for being a Secondary Site. The 2nd method is to integrate the steps into a Task Sequence that also deploys a Server 2003 or Server 2008 R2 image along with configuring the server to be a ConfigMgr Secondary Site.

Assumptions

This document assumes the following:

· You have a working and properly configured Configuration Manager 2007 SP2/R3 Primary Site

· You have Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 Update 1 installed

· You have integrated MDT with ConfigMgr

· You have an existing MDT toolkit package

· SQL is configured to allow Named Pipes

· You have already created at least one DeploymentShare in MDT

· You have already created a SQL$ share

· You have the knowledge of how to create the required ConfigMgr packages

Supported Operating Systems

The Hydration process has been tested on Server 2003 R2 SP1/SP2 and Server 2008 R2 SP1.

Hydration Files

The files are contained in a “ConfigMgr_Install.zip” archive. Once these files are extracted, you will need to modify a few of the script files and add the required source files. This section details those required changes.

The following tables details the included file/folder structure.

Table 1: Folder Structure

Folder

Description

\SQL Files

SQL files to extend MDT database and refresh views

\Import_Computer

PowerShell and CSV for bulk import of ConfigMgr Secondary Site servers

\Templates

Task Sequence template and CustomSettings.ini template

\Configure WebDAV

Script to configure WebDAV for Server 2008 R2

\ConfigMgr Server 2003 IIS

Script to configure IIS for Server 2003

\ConfigMgr Create Senders

Script to create Primary site to Child site sender

\ConfigMgr 2007 Toolkit V2

ConfigMgr Toolkit (trace32)

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary

Script and source files for installing ConfigMgr secondary site

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3

Script and source files for installing ConfigMgr R3 and necessary pre-requisite hotfix

Source Files

Sources files are required for the following items.

Table 2: Required Source Files

Folder

Description

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3\Source

R3 installation files

\ConfigMgr 2007 R3\Hotfix

R3 Pre-req hotfix 977384

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary\PreReqs

ConfigMgr downloaded preq-reqs’s

\ConfigMgr 2007 SP2 Secondary\Source

ConfigMgr installation files

\ConfigMgr 2007 Toolkit V2\Source

ConfigMgr Toolkit MSI

\ConfigMgr Server 2003 IIS\i386

I386 directory from 2003 media

Installation

Creating the MDT Database

This Hydration solution relies on a “SCRIPTSITECODE” variable. This solution was developed around this information being populated in the MDT database. It is possible to configure and set this variable through other methods, but this guide will not address those.

1) Open the MDT workbench and expand your DeploymentShare

2) Select Advanced Configuration-Database

3) Right-Click on Database and select New Database

4) Input the name of the SQL server and make sure the Network Library is selected to Named Pipes, then select Next

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5) Input MDT2010 for the Database Name and select Next

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6) Input SQL$ for the SQL Share, then select Nextclip_image006

7) Select Next

8) Select Finish

Extending the MDT database

Provided with the Hydration files are 2 SQL files for extending the MDT database with the SCRIPTSITECODE value and refreshing the views.

Open the “create scriptsitecode.sql” in SQL Management Studio.

Ensure that you are pointing to the MDT database.

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Once you are pointed to MDT Database. You can Execute the query.

You should see “Command(s) completed successfully”

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Next open the “refresh MDT views.sql” and make sure you are again pointed to correct database.

clip_image011

You should see “Command(s) completed successfully”

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If you open up the MDT workbench, go into Advance Configuration – Database- Computers, you will now see a new property called ScriptSiteCode listed on the Settings tab.

clip_image013

Bulk Importing Records Into The MDT Database

A PowerShell script and CSV file are provided for the bulk import of computers into the MDT database. These computers are the servers we want to configure as Secondary Sites.

CSV

The CSV file contains the Description, MacAddress, and ScriptSiteCode values we want to import into the Database.

clip_image014

We use the MacAddress to identify the server and configure the appropriate SiteCode for the ConfigMgr installation. The SiteCode is stored in the ScriptSiteCode variable. The description is just a friendly name so we can identify the server in the database.

PowerShell Script

The provided PowerShell script will do a bulk import of the CSV file into the MDT database. The PowerShell script imports a MDT Module, connects to the MDT database and imports the information from the CSV file.

Edit the PowerShell script to make sure the paths are correct to the source files.

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Edit the PowerShell script to make sure the correct SQLServer and Database are specified.

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After running the import, you will see the records in the Database based on the information in the CSV.

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Configuration Manager Packages

The following folders from the Hydration files will need be to created as Packages in ConfigMgr.

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These packages will be used by the Task Sequence template. No Programs are required for the packages, simply create a Package that references the source files so we can make them available to the Task Sequence.

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NOTE: The ConfigMgr Toolkit can simply be imported as a MSI.

Task Sequence Template

A Task Sequence XML is provided in the \Templates folder in the Hydration files.

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This template contains all the necessary steps to configure either a 2003 or 2008 R2 server for being a Secondary Site. In addition to the packages containing the Hydration files, we need to use MDT Toolkit Package and a Settings Package.

The required steps in the template need to be configured to point to the ConfigMgr packages you have created.

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CustomSettings.ini

A customsetings.ini for use with Task Sequence template has been provided in the \Templates folder.

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The SQLServer and Database values will need to be changed to match your environment.

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Ensure that the Gather step in the template is pointing to your Settings package.

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Required Script Modifications

InstallConfigMgr2007SP2.wsf

There is a section of code in this script that allows you to specify existing source files to use, if we can find those, we will use those to install ConfigMgr, otherwise we’ll use the files from the script source files directory.

The following code would need to be changed in the script to match the location you might have local source files. It is located at line 93 in the script.

sFile = "F:\folderpath\smssetup\bin\i386\setup.exe"

ConfigureSvr2003.wsf

There is also logic in the 2003 IIS script that checks for a local copy of the i386 directory. We look for the i386 directory at the root of the C: drive. If we don’t find it then we copy it down from the source files. In addition we set a few registry keys to let Windows know where the source files are located. If you wanted to change this location, you would need to modify the following lines of code.

Line 57 – Check for local i386

sFile = "C:\i386\setup.ex_"

Lines 70-72 – Update registry to point to C:\i386

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\SourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\ServicePackSourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

oShell.RegWrite "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SourcePath", "C:\", "REG_SZ"

CreateConfigMgrSenders.wsf

The sender creation script is coded to the primary site. This will need to be modified to point to your primary site.

Lines 51-52

primSiteCode = "001"

primSite = "2008-configmgr"

Using with an OSD Task Sequence

The provided TS template in \templates can also be used with an OSD TS to create a Secondary Site from bare-metal. The template can simply be copied into an existing OSD TS.

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Download the script files here.

Aside

The Complete SCUP 2011 installation and configuration guide

Fellow MVP Kent Agerlund has a great post with a nice download for installing and configuring SCUP 2011. 

Read his original post here.

The latest version of System Center Custom Updates Publisher 2011 is released and ready for download. SCUP 2011 is a freeware tool from Microsoft that can assist you in authoring and publishing 3rd. party updates to Configuration Manager and System Center Essentials.

To get you started you can download the complete SCUP 2011 installation and configuration guide here I hope the guide can save you a few hours of work and get you up and running with SCUP today.

In my guide I have references to two files used to deploy the needed certificates. Those are:

Certutil.exe and certadm.dll, both files are part of the Windows Server 2003 Administration Tools Pack.

Happy “Scuping”

Video

Configuration Manager 2012–Extending the AD Schema Video Walkthrough

Quick video on how to extend the Active Directory Schema for ConfigMgr 2012 Beta 2. This video will also apply to ConfigMgr 2007.

Video

Configuration Manager 2012– Initial Installation Video Walkthrough

Here is a quick video walkthrough of the initial installation of ConfigMgr 2012, this is Beta 2. Hope this helps.

Aside

Step by Step Guide for Extending Active Directory Schema for System Center Configuration Manager

Account Permissions

The account that will be used to run the extadsch.exe needs to have appropriate access and be in the “Schema Admins” group. You cannot run the extadsch.exe with alternate credentials using Run As.

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Locating ExtADSch.exe

The exe used to extend the AD Schema can be located in the default installation directory under the bin\i386 folder.

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If you have installed ConfigMgr to an alternate location, then it will be located in that installation path (installation paht\bin\i386).

Running ExtADSch.exe

You can run the file by either opening a command prompt and running the extadsch.exe, or by double-clicking the file.

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Once it’s ran, you are looking for the “Successfully extended the Active Directory schema” output. You can also view the results by viewing the ExtADSch.log that is created on the C: drive.

This log file will detail the changes made to the schema and also show the success of the schema extensions.

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Creating the Systems Management Container

After the schema is extended successfully, the Systems Management container needs to be created in Active Directory.

Open ADSI Edit and expand to the “System” container.

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Right-click on the System container and select “new” then “object”.

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Select “container” from the object list, and then select “Next”.

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Next, enter in “System Management” and then click “Next”.

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Click “Finish”.

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Once you click Finish, you should see the new container listed.

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Setting Security on the System Management container

Once the System Management container has been successfully created in Active Directory, the appropriate permissions needs to be set on the object.

With ADSI Edit still open, right-click on the System Management container object and select properties.

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Go to the Security tab of the Properties dialog box and then select “Add”. Once the next dialog box opens, add the computer account of the primary site server(s) or the Active Directory group containing the servers. It’s recommended to use an Active Directory group so that you are not required to make this change again. Once you have entered in the required information, select “Ok”

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Select “Full Control” for the site server or group you just added.

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Next select Advanced, and then configure the server or AD group permissions to apply to “this object and all descendant objects”.

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Click “OK” 3 times to save your changes.

Aside

Configuration Manager R3 – Prestaged Media Setup and Walkthrough

This blog will be a walkthrough and setup guide for Configuration Manager (ConfigMgr) R3 prestaged media.  This will cover the basic steps required in order to use the new R3 feature in your environment.

First some background on prestaged media from Microsoft:

Prestaged media is an alternative way to deploy an operating system to computers. Prestaged media is a Windows Image (.wim) file that can be installed on bare metal computers by the computer manufacturer or at an enterprise staging center. This media includes a boot image and an operating system image that an administrator can predeploy to a hard disk prior.  Prestaged media reduces network traffic and the time required to provision a computer. Prestaged media works with existing task sequences to provide a complete operating system deployment.

Prestaged media is suitable for use in environments where you would want to deploy content to a computer, but do not want to or are unable to have the computer fully provisioned, for example during the computer manufacturing process or at an enterprise staging center. Computers are distributed within the enterprise with the prestaged media already loaded. When the computer starts for the first time, the computer will boot into WinPE and connect to the Configuration Manager site management point to check for available task sequences.

NOTE: When creating prestaged media, ensure that the boot image you are using has the appropriate network and mass storage drivers need for the system to complete the provisioning process.

Creating the prestaged media image

Right click on Task Sequences and select “Create Task Sequence Media”.

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Select “Prestaged Media”.

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Enter any information you want added to the .wim file, then specify the location and name of the file, then click Next.

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Take note of what you put in the Created By field because whatever you put there, will end up the name of the drive as in these examples.

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You can however change the field in the image properties.  If you leave it blank, then “SCCM” will be added automatically for you. 

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Next, you can select whether or not to enable unknown computer support, password protect the media, as well as the certificate options.

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Next, we need to select the boot image and operating system you want to stage to the computer.

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Then we have our summary before the operation begins.

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Click Close when the process is completed.

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Importing the prestaged image into ConfigMgr

Next we need to import our newly created .wim into ConfigMgr.

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Browse to the path where you put the prestaged wim we previously created. Then select Next.

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Provide properties for the image, then select Next.

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Review the summary and then select Next.

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Click Close when the process has completed.

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Next you will need to distribute the image out to the distribution points. Right-click on the image and select Manage Distribution Points.  Then select “Copy the package to new distribution points”. Then select Next.

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Select the Distribution Points you want to copy the image to, then select Next.

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Select Next.

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Click Close when the process completes.  You can monitor distrmgr.log to review the distribution status.

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Creating a Task Sequence to deploy the prestaged image to a computer

Right-click on Task Sequences and select New – Task Sequence.

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Select “Create a new custom Task Sequence”.

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Name the Task Sequence appropriately and then select Next.

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Select Next.

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After the process completes successfully, click Close.

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Ensure the Task Sequence has the appropriate boot media. You can do this by selecting Properties on the Task Sequence.

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Ensure the boot image selected is the same one as you used when creating the Prestaged Media image.

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Next we need to edit the Task Sequence and add the appropriate steps.

First we need to add a “Format and Partition Disk” step.

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If you are using Bitlocker, then you’ll need to create a 100mb partition, something similar to this example.

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If you are not using bitlocker, then you can just create a single partition.

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NOTE: You do not need a Bootsect.exe command as you may have seen with other documentation.  This is unnecessary as the Format and Partition disk step takes care of this for you. 

Next we need to add a “Apply Data Image” step. Select the Prestaged media image you had previously imported.

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If you are not using bitlocker, then you can leave the Destination as “next available formatted partition”.

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If you are using bitlocker, then you need to change the Destination to match your configuration.

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Next we need to add another “Run Command Line” step to shutdown the computer and end the Task Sequence.

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Using a command line of “wpeutil shutdown”.

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The finalized Task Sequence should look something like this.

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Next if you advertise this Task Sequence to the appropriate collection, then you can run this Task Sequence on a reference machine to apply the prestaged image to that machine. (Other Task Sequences have been removed from the screenshot)

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Configuring a Task Sequence to “finish” a prestaged image

Prestaged media is designed to work with your existing Task Sequences.  We only need to make one minor change to the “Partition Disk” step in order for Prestaged media to work successfully. We need to add a Task Sequence variable step that says _SMSTSMediaType not equals OEMmedia. This tells the Task Sequence to skip this step when using Prestaged media, so that we don’t delete the content we’ve prestaged.

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No change is required to the Apply Operating System step as the logic already exists to detect OEMMedia.

You will however, need to configure your Destination to match whether or not you are deploying bitlocker or whatever other custom setup you may have.

If you are using bitlocker, ensure this step matches the configuration you used when applying the prestaged image to the disk.

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If you are not using bitlocker, then just use the default configuration.

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Executing the Task Sequence on a prestaged machine

If you power on a computer that has a prestage image applied to it, it will automatically boot the WinPE image that is staged on the machine.

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Then we can contact the ConfigMgr server and get our policies.

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You will see it run through the first Task Sequence steps fairly quickly.

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After a couple minutes you’ll see the system reboot.

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Sysprep will then run, along with whatever final configurations you have in your Task Sequence and you should find yourself with a computer joined to the domain and ready to log in within a few minutes.  In my Hyper-V lab, without any additional software applications to install, the login prompt was presented in less than 10 minutes after starting the Task Sequence.

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Aside

Configuration Manager–Installing ConfigMgr R2 Client Status Reporting

Select “Client Status Reporting” from the main installation wizard under the “Additional Content” section. You can also browse to the “Client Status Reporting” folder on the CD as the install will take you there anyways.

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Launch the “Clientstatusreporting” MSI.

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Select “Next”.

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Select “I accept the license agreement” and select “Next”.

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Select the destination folder and select “Next”.

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Select “Next” to start the installation.

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Select “Finish”.

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You will have a new menu option in the Start menu. Launch the “Configure Client Status Reporting” to finalize the installation.

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On the “Site Settings” tab, you will need to configure the SQL server and instance, along with what account you want the Client Status reporting to run under. I typically will configure it to use the local system account.

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On the Options tab, you will want to select the “Update Configuration Manager 2007 site database with inactive client information”, you will also want to configure the client activity periods for your environment.

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On the Schedule tab, you will want to enable the Client pulse settings along with the Client ping settings. You will also want to configure the schedules for those settings.

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Importing the Client Status reports into Configuration Manager

Select “Import Objects” on the Reporting node.

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Select “Next”.

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Select “Browse”.

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Browse to the path you see below. Then select “Open”.

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Select “Next”.

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Select “Next”.

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Select “Next”.

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Select “Finish”.

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After the reports have been imported, you can see them listed in the reports folder.

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Aside

Configuration Manager–Installing ConfigMgr R2

Open up the installation and select “Configuration Manager 2007 R2” under the Install section.

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Select “Next”.

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Select “I accept the license agreement” and select “Next”.

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Select “Next”.

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Select “Next”.

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Select “Finish”.

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